Best Bitcoin Tax Calculators For 2020 - Complete Guide to ...

[Serious] How to deal with Crypto Tax 2020?

First of all, please upvote for visibility + more opinions - this concerns all of us. Also, if you're stupid enough to think you'll get away with avoiding tax's despite KYC'ing to Coinbase & Binance don't bother commenting. News flash! you're gonna end up paying that tax in the long run + huge fines eating into your gains (or even putting you into debt).

Anyways... I started investing in 2017. As a noob I did what most people did, chased multiple shitcoins, bought and sold various different pumps getting wrecked along the way. Then towards the end of the year, my portfolio increased significantly... but I DIDN'T sell - so I didn't "crystalise" any gainz. (I sold a couple hundred here and there during hard financial times, but I'm guessing nothing close to the free capital gains allowance).
Fast forward just over 2 years, since then I've been buying BTC/ETH/XMR on a consistent basis. It's getting to the point where if I were to sell enough of my stack, I'd owe tax as it'd be over the "allowed" CGT threshold.
That leads me to my question... how the fuck are you supposed to calculate capital gains tax when it comes to crypto? For the past 3 years I've traded in and out of alt-coins on multiple exchanges (some of which don't even exist anymore). It would be easy if it was just FIAT IN vs FIAT OUT, but the fact that CRYPTO to CRYPTO is considered taxable just makes it a nightmare! On top of that I did some freelance work (paid in BTC) which adds to the complexity.
Take another example of what confuses me: Say I bought 1BTC on Coinbase in 2017, then 1BTC on Kraken in 2018, then 0.5BTC on Coinbase again in 2019, and hold them all in the same wallet. Then if I were to sell 0.5BTC in 2020, what Bitcoin was actually sold? Half of the 1 BTC bought in 2017? Is it FIFO?
I genuinely don't know where to start and need help. I don't want to be in a shitty situation (for example some massive 2017-esque bull run happens just before the end of the tax year and I decide to cash out and have 3 days to sort shit out). I want to be prepared.

I've come across services such as https://www.cointracker.io/ /https://bitcoin.tax/ etc but feel really hesitant to give quasi-unknown companies full read access to my wallet addresses, portfolio amount, personal email address etc. Privacy is key in the crypto space and I don't want another attack vector especially after seeing much more established companies such as Ledger fucking up (idiots) and losing my personal data.
What do I do? I've even thought of selling EVERYTHING to FIAT and immediately buying it all back and taking whatever fine comes my way on the chin just so I can clearly track crypto transactions and not have to stress about it.
If anyone has experience with crypto tax's please share any information that may be valuable to me/all the many others that are in the same situation as me.

TL;DR: Bought loads of Bitcoin and Shitcoins throughout the past 3 years, finally starting to total up to an amount that'd be taxable if I sold a chunk - dafuq do I do regarding Taxes?
submitted by finbar93 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

10-31 22:06 - '[Serious] How to deal with Crypto Tax 2020?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/finbar93 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 338-348min

'''
First of all, please upvote for visibility + more opinions - this concerns all of us. Also, if you're stupid enough to think you'll get away with avoiding tax's despite KYC'ing to Coinbase & Binance don't bother commenting. News flash! you're gonna end up paying that tax in the long run + huge fines eating into your gains (or even putting you into debt).

Anyways... I started investing in 2017. As a noob I did what most people did, chased multiple shitcoins, bought and sold various different pumps getting wrecked along the way. Then towards the end of the year, my portfolio increased significantly... but I DIDN'T sell - so I didn't "crystalise" any gainz. (I sold a couple hundred here and there during hard financial times, but I'm guessing nothing close to the free capital gains allowance).
Fast forward just over 2 years, since then I've been buying BTC/ETH/XMR on a consistent basis. It's getting to the point where if I were to sell enough of my stack, I'd owe tax as it'd be over the "allowed" CGT threshold.
That leads me to my question... how the fuck are you supposed to calculate capital gains tax when it comes to crypto? For the past 3 years I've traded in and out of alt-coins on multiple exchanges (some of which don't even exist anymore). It would be easy if it was just FIAT IN vs FIAT OUT, but the fact that CRYPTO to CRYPTO is considered taxable just makes it a nightmare! On top of that I did some freelance work (paid in BTC) which adds to the complexity.
Take another example of what confuses me: Say I bought 1BTC on Coinbase in 2017, then 1BTC on Kraken in 2018, then 0.5BTC on Coinbase again in 2019, and hold them all in the same wallet. Then if I were to sell 0.5BTC in 2020, what Bitcoin was actually sold? Half of the 1 BTC bought in 2017? Is it FIFO?
I genuinely don't know where to start and need help. I don't want to be in a shitty situation (for example some massive 2017-esque bull run happens just before the end of the tax year and I decide to cash out and have 3 days to sort shit out). I want to be prepared.

I've come across services such as [[link]3 /[[link]4 etc but feel really hesitant to give quasi-unknown companies full read access to my wallet addresses, portfolio amount, personal email address etc. Privacy is key in the crypto space and I don't want another attack vector especially after seeing much more established companies such as Ledger fucking up (idiots) and losing my personal data.
What do I do? I've even thought of selling EVERYTHING to FIAT and immediately buying it all back and taking whatever fine comes my way on the chin just so I can clearly track crypto transactions and not have to stress about it.
If anyone has experience with crypto tax's please share any information that may be valuable to me/all the many others that are in the same situation as me.

TL;DR: Bought loads of Bitcoin and Shitcoins throughout the past 3 years, finally starting to total up to an amount that'd be taxable if I sold a chunk - dafuq do I do regarding Taxes?
'''
[Serious] How to deal with Crypto Tax 2020?
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Author: finbar93
1: www**oin*rac**r.io/ 2: bitc*i**tax/ 3: *ww.co*ntra*ker*i*/]*^1 4: bi*coi**tax/*^^2
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submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

ETHE & GBTC (Grayscale) Frequently Asked Questions

It is no doubt Grayscale’s booming popularity as a mainstream investment has caused a lot of community hullabaloo lately. As such, I felt it was worth making a FAQ regarding the topic. I’m looking to update this as needed and of course am open to suggestions / adding any questions.
The goal is simply to have a thread we can link to anyone with questions on Grayscale and its products. Instead of explaining the same thing 3 times a day, shoot those posters over to this thread. My hope is that these questions are answered in a fairly simple and easy to understand manner. I think as the sub grows it will be a nice reference point for newcomers.
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for Grayscale and as such am basing all these answers on information that can be found on their website / reports. (Grayscale’s official FAQ can be found here). I also do NOT have a finance degree, I do NOT have a Series 6 / 7 / 140-whatever, and I do NOT work with investment products for my day job. I have an accounting background and work within the finance world so I have the general ‘business’ knowledge to put it all together, but this is all info determined in my best faith effort as a layman. The point being is this --- it is possible I may explain something wrong or missed the technical terms, and if that occurs I am more than happy to update anything that can be proven incorrect
Everything below will be in reference to ETHE but will apply to GBTC as well. If those two segregate in any way, I will note that accordingly.
What is Grayscale? 
Grayscale is the company that created the ETHE product. Their website is https://grayscale.co/
What is ETHE? 
ETHE is essentially a stock that intends to loosely track the price of ETH. It does so by having each ETHE be backed by a specific amount of ETH that is held on chain. Initially, the newly minted ETHE can only be purchased by institutions and accredited investors directly from Grayscale. Once a year has passed (6 months for GBTC) it can then be listed on the OTCQX Best Market exchange for secondary trading. Once listed on OTCQX, anyone investor can purchase at this point. Additional information on ETHE can be found here.
So ETHE is an ETF? 
No. For technical reasons beyond my personal understandings it is not labeled an ETF. I know it all flows back to the “Securities Act Rule 144”, but due to my limited knowledge on SEC regulations I don’t want to misspeak past that. If anyone is more knowledgeable on the subject I am happy to input their answer here.
How long has ETHE existed? 
ETHE was formed 12/14/2017. GBTC was formed 9/25/2013.
How is ETHE created? 
The trust will issue shares to “Authorized Participants” in groups of 100 shares (called baskets). Authorized Participants are the only persons that may place orders to create these baskets and they do it on behalf of the investor.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 39 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Note – The way their reports word this makes it sound like there is an army of authorizers doing the dirty work, but in reality there is only one Authorized Participant. At this moment the “Genesis” company is the sole Authorized Participant. Genesis is owned by the “Digital Currency Group, Inc.” which is the parent company of Grayscale as well. (And to really go down the rabbit hole it looks like DCG is the parent company of CoinDesk and is “backing 150+ companies across 30 countries, including Coinbase, Ripple, and Chainalysis.”)
Source: Digital Currency Group, Inc. informational section on page 77 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
Source: Barry E. Silbert informational section on page 75 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
How does Grayscale acquire the ETH to collateralize the ETHE product? 
An Investor may acquire ETHE by paying in cash or exchanging ETH already owned.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 40 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Where does Grayscale store their ETH? Does it have a specific wallet address we can follow? 
ETH is stored with Coinbase Custody Trust Company, LLC. I am unaware of any specific address or set of addresses that can be used to verify the ETH is actually there.
As an aside - I would actually love to see if anyone knows more about this as it’s something that’s sort of peaked my interest after being asked about it… I find it doubtful we can find that however.
Source: Part C. Business Information, Item 8, subsection A. on page 16 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Can ETHE be redeemed for ETH? 
No, currently there is no way to give your shares of ETHE back to Grayscale to receive ETH back. The only method of getting back into ETH would be to sell your ETHE to someone else and then use those proceeds to buy ETH yourself.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Why are they not redeeming shares? 
I think the report summarizes it best:
Redemptions of Shares are currently not permitted and the Trust is unable to redeem Shares. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval from the SEC and approval by the Sponsor in its sole discretion, the Trust may in the future operate a redemption program. Because the Trust does not believe that the SEC would, at this time, entertain an application for the waiver of rules needed in order to operate an ongoing redemption program, the Trust currently has no intention of seeking regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the fee structure? 
ETHE has an annual fee of 2.5%. GBTC has an annual fee of 2.0%. Fees are paid by selling the underlying ETH / BTC collateralizing the asset.
Source: ETHE’s informational page on Grayscale’s website - Located Here
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 & 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the ratio of ETH to ETHE? 
At the time of posting (6/19/2020) each ETHE share is backed by .09391605 ETH. Each share of GBTC is backed by .00096038 BTC.
ETHE & GBTC’s specific information page on Grayscale’s website updates the ratio daily – Located Here
For a full historical look at this ratio, it can be found on the Grayscale home page on the upper right side if you go to Tax Documents > 2019 Tax Documents > Grayscale Ethereum Trust 2019 Tax Letter.
Why is the ratio not 1:1? Why is it always decreasing? 
While I cannot say for certain why the initial distribution was not a 1:1 backing, it is more than likely to keep the price down and allow more investors a chance to purchase ETHE / GBTC.
As noted above, fees are paid by selling off the ETH collateralizing ETHE. So this number will always be trending downward as time goes on.
Source: Description of Trust on page 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
I keep hearing about how this is locked supply… explain? 
As noted above, there is currently no redemption program for converting your ETHE back into ETH. This means that once an ETHE is issued, it will remain in circulation until a redemption program is formed --- something that doesn’t seem to be too urgent for the SEC or Grayscale at the moment. Tiny amounts will naturally be removed due to fees, but the bulk of the asset is in there for good.
Knowing that ETHE cannot be taken back and destroyed at this time, the ETH collateralizing it will not be removed from the wallet for the foreseeable future. While it is not fully locked in the sense of say a totally lost key, it is not coming out any time soon.
Per their annual statement:
The Trust’s ETH will be transferred out of the ETH Account only in the following circumstances: (i) transferred to pay the Sponsor’s Fee or any Additional Trust Expenses, (ii) distributed in connection with the redemption of Baskets (subject to the Trust’s obtaining regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program and the consent of the Sponsor), (iii) sold on an as-needed basis to pay Additional Trust Expenses or (iv) sold on behalf of the Trust in the event the Trust terminates and liquidates its assets or as otherwise required by law or regulation.
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Grayscale now owns a huge chunk of both ETH and BTC’s supply… should we be worried about manipulation, a sell off to crash the market crash, a staking cartel? 
First, it’s important to remember Grayscale is a lot more akin to an exchange then say an investment firm. Grayscale is working on behalf of its investors to create this product for investor control. Grayscale doesn’t ‘control’ the ETH it holds any more then Coinbase ‘controls’ the ETH in its hot wallet. (Note: There are likely some varying levels of control, but specific to this topic Grayscale cannot simply sell [legally, at least] the ETH by their own decision in the same manner Coinbase wouldn't be able to either.)
That said, there shouldn’t be any worry in the short to medium time-frame. As noted above, Grayscale can’t really remove ETH other than for fees or termination of the product. At 2.5% a year, fees are noise in terms of volume. Grayscale seems to be the fastest growing product in the crypto space at the moment and termination of the product seems unlikely.
IF redemptions were to happen tomorrow, it’s extremely unlikely we would see a mass exodus out of the product to redeem for ETH. And even if there was incentive to get back to ETH, the premium makes it so that it would be much more cost effective to just sell your ETHE on the secondary market and buy ETH yourself. Remember, any redemption is up to the investors and NOT something Grayscale has direct control over.
Yes, but what about [insert criminal act here]… 
Alright, yes. Technically nothing is stopping Grayscale from selling all the ETH / BTC and running off to the Bahamas (Hawaii?). BUT there is no real reason for them to do so. Barry is an extremely public figure and it won’t be easy for him to get away with that. Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust creates SEC reports weekly / bi-weekly and I’m sure given the sentiment towards crypto is being watched carefully. Plus, Grayscale is making tons of consistent revenue and thus has little to no incentive to give that up for a quick buck.
That’s a lot of ‘happy little feels’ Bob, is there even an independent audit or is this Tether 2.0? 
Actually yes, an independent auditor report can be found in their annual reports. It is clearly aimed more towards the financial side and I doubt the auditors are crypto savants, but it is at least one extra set of eyes. Auditors are Friedman LLP – Auditor since 2015.
Source: Independent Auditor Report starting on page 116 (of the PDF itself) of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
As mentioned by user TheCrpytosAndBloods (In Comments Below), a fun fact:
The company’s auditors Friedman LLP were also coincidentally TetheBitfinex’s auditors until They controversially parted ways in 2018 when the Tether controversy was at its height. I am not suggesting for one moment that there is anything shady about DCG - I just find it interesting it’s the same auditor.
“Grayscale sounds kind of lame” / “Not your keys not your crypto!” / “Why is anyone buying this, it sounds like a scam?” 
Welp, for starters this honestly is not really a product aimed at the people likely to be reading this post. To each their own, but do remember just because something provides no value to you doesn’t mean it can’t provide value to someone else. That said some of the advertised benefits are as follows:
So for example, I can set up an IRA at a brokerage account that has $0 trading fees. Then I can trade GBTC and ETHE all day without having to worry about tracking my taxes. All with the relative safety something like E-Trade provides over Binance.
As for how it benefits the everyday ETH holder? I think the supply lock is a positive. I also think this product exposes the Ethereum ecosystem to people who otherwise wouldn’t know about it.
Why is there a premium? Why is ETHE’s premium so insanely high compared to GBTC’s premium? 
There are a handful of theories of why a premium exists at all, some even mentioned in the annual report. The short list is as follows:
Why is ETHE’s so much higher the GBTC’s? Again, a few thoughts:

Are there any other differences between ETHE and GBTC? 
I touched on a few of the smaller differences, but one of the more interesting changes is GBTC is now a “SEC reporting company” as of January 2020. Which again goes beyond my scope of knowledge so I won’t comment on it too much… but the net result is GBTC is now putting out weekly / bi-weekly 8-K’s and annual 10-K’s. This means you can track GBTC that much easier at the moment as well as there is an extra layer of validity to the product IMO.
I’m looking for some statistics on ETHE… such as who is buying, how much is bought, etc? 
There is a great Q1 2020 report I recommend you give a read that has a lot of cool graphs and data on the product. It’s a little GBTC centric, but there is some ETHE data as well. It can be found here hidden within the 8-K filings.Q1 2020 is the 4/16/2020 8-K filing.
For those more into a GAAP style report see the 2019 annual 10-K of the same location.
Is Grayscale only just for BTC and ETH? 
No, there are other products as well. In terms of a secondary market product, ETCG is the Ethereum Classic version of ETHE. Fun Fact – ETCG was actually put out to the secondary market first. It also has a 3% fee tied to it where 1% of it goes to some type of ETC development fund.
In terms of institutional and accredited investors, there are a few ‘fan favorites’ such as Bitcoin Cash, Litcoin, Stellar, XRP, and Zcash. Something called Horizion (Backed by ZEN I guess? Idk to be honest what that is…). And a diversified Mutual Fund type fund that has a little bit of all of those. None of these products are available on the secondary market.
Are there alternatives to Grayscale? 
I know they exist, but I don’t follow them. I’ll leave this as a “to be edited” section and will add as others comment on what they know.
Per user Over-analyser (in comments below):
Coinshares (Formerly XBT provider) are the only similar product I know of. BTC, ETH, XRP and LTC as Exchange Traded Notes (ETN).
It looks like they are fully backed with the underlying crypto (no premium).
https://coinshares.com/etps/xbt-provideinvestor-resources/daily-hedging-position
Denominated in SEK and EUR. Certainly available in some UK pensions (SIPP).
As asked by pegcity - Okay so I was under the impression you can just give them your own ETH and get ETHE, but do you get 11 ETHE per ETH or do you get the market value of ETH in USD worth of ETHE? 
I have always understood that the ETHE issued directly through Grayscale is issued without the premium. As in, if I were to trade 1 ETH for ETHE I would get 11, not say only 2 or 3 because the secondary market premium is so high. And if I were paying cash only I would be paying the price to buy 1 ETH to get my 11 ETHE. Per page 39 of their annual statement, it reads as follows:
The Trust will issue Shares to Authorized Participants from time to time, but only in one or more Baskets (with a Basket being a block of 100 Shares). The Trust will not issue fractions of a Basket. The creation (and, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redemption) of Baskets will be made only in exchange for the delivery to the Trust, or the distribution by the Trust, of the number of whole and fractional ETH represented by each Basket being created (or, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redeemed), which is determined by dividing (x) the number of ETH owned by the Trust at 4:00 p.m., New York time, on the trade date of a creation or redemption order, after deducting the number of ETH representing the U.S. dollar value of accrued but unpaid fees and expenses of the Trust (converted using the ETH Index Price at such time, and carried to the eighth decimal place), by (y) the number of Shares outstanding at such time (with the quotient so obtained calculated to one one-hundred-millionth of one ETH (i.e., carried to the eighth decimal place)), and multiplying such quotient by 100 (the “Basket ETH Amount”). All questions as to the calculation of the Basket ETH Amount will be conclusively determined by the Sponsor and will be final and binding on all persons interested in the Trust. The Basket ETH Amount multiplied by the number of Baskets being created or redeemed is the “Total Basket ETH Amount.” The number of ETH represented by a Share will gradually decrease over time as the Trust’s ETH are used to pay the Trust’s expenses. Each Share represented approximately 0.0950 ETH and 0.0974 ETH as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

submitted by Bob-Rossi to ethfinance [link] [comments]

US Tax Guide for ETH and other cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, fellow ethtraders! Happy New Year! In the next few months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As an Enrolled Agent and a ETH/cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in ETH and other cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are ETH/cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell ETH, BTC, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my ETH for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the ETH, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or another cryptocurrency, is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your ETH for USD. The second transaction is buying the OMG with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts. For example, I buy 1 ETH for $600 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 ETH rises to $700. I transfer that 1 ETH to Bittrex and use it to buy 37 OMG. I have to report a capital gain of $100 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 37 OMG I purchased is $700.
 
4. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or other cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 ETH for $300 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 ETH for $800. Your realized gain would be $800 - $300 = $500. Since you held it for one year or less, the $500 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which ETH's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first ETH at $300, a second ETH at $530, and a third ETH at $400. Later on, I sell one ETH for $800. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first ETH, $300, which would result in a gain of $500.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third ETH, $400, which would result in a gain of $400.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three ETH, $410, which would result in a gain of $390.
Specific identification - I can just choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second ETH's cost basis, $530, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $270.
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine ETH or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $7,000 worth of ETH in 2017, you must report $7,000 of income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $7,000 becomes the cost basis in your ETH position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 1 ETH on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for ETH and average the high and low prices for ETH on December 31, 2017, which is ($760.35 + $710.12) / 2 = $735.24. I would report $735.24 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 1 ETH I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive ETH or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use ETH, BTC, or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your ETH at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. Taxation is theft!
I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one, this one, and this one, but I wanted to post my short summary guide on ethtrader which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of ETH and other cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I have made many edits to my post since I originally posted it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

I finally figured out how to file my taxes with crypto gains. Using multiple exchanges, Cointracking.info, and Turbotax.

I spent a lot of time gaining information on Reddit so I figured I'd give back by summarizing how I filed my (U.S.) taxes in what I believe was the correct manner. Real quick, I used Cointracking.info (can also use Bitcoin.tax) to calculate my gains/losses using FIFO and generate my tax reports. I filed using the Deluxe desktop version of Turbotax so I can upload my reports. NO I DID NOT HAVE TO MANUALLY ENTER EACH TRANSACTION! But you have to get the CD/Downloaded version of Turbotax. There is no web version that allows you to upload your reports...and don't worry, after calling to confirm this with Turbotax I let them have it. Also, I am not being paid or providing referrals to any of these sites/programs....they worked for me so I figured I'd share for free.
I am not a tax or accountant professional so take the following with a grain of salt....
First things first, you have to figure out your "realized" crypto gains. I'm not going to go into detail here as many will ignore the truth that converting from one crypto to another is considered a taxable event. You're an adult, you make your own decisions but honestly I was surprised at how little of my crypto was considered realized once I ran all my numbers.
Since I've started crypto, I've used a couple different exchanges and Shapeshift (will never use again after this whole ordeal). Cointracking.info gives instructions on how to import your trades from all the major exchanges. (WARNING: pay attention to the timezones; Coinbase for example shows you the time of transaction in your timezone when you're viewing the site but once you download the data it will switch to Pacific Time, Binance will be in UTC time...etc.) If you don't have the time correct then your FIFO calculations and Short/Long term gains can be off. Shapeshift or any other non-exchange activity can be uploaded using excel or you can manually add individual transactions. Don't forget to review the transactions once you think you have every thing into your coin tracking site as the super nerds who created the algorithms aren't always correct. Ask your self questions like "did I really make a trade at 3:00 am on a work-night" or "does my final balance match what I actually have in my wallets".
Once you have all your transactions completed you can download the Form 8949, (keep this for your records in case you're ever audited or more information is requested) and a Turbotax specific file called Capital Gains Report. File your taxes on the DESKTOP version of Turbotax as you normally would. When it asks about income there is a place you can go to upload documents. Upload the Capital Gains Report provided. Turbotax is smart enough to recognize and auto populate all ~75 trades that I had onto a 1099-B. Again, NOT A PROFESSIONAL, I heard something about mailing in your Schedule D/8949 but everything seems to be reported correctly on the 1099-B so this does not appear to be necessary. And that was it! I live in North Carolina and I did not see anywhere where I needed to report any of this information for the state form.
If you don't want to believe a stranger on Reddit then you can get the desktop version of the Premier Turbotax which comes with the ability to get free CPA help over the phone. Or you go to your tax professional and have him/her do your taxes but they'll need the Form 8949 provided to you by your coin tracking site.
Feel free to let me know if I'm an idiot in the comments as again, I am not a tax professional nor an accountant, just a guy who likes to DIY and learn how/why taxes work to save some money.
submitted by Lusitanius to litecoin [link] [comments]

I finally figured out how to file my taxes with crypto gains. Using multiple exchanges, Cointracking.info, and Turbotax.

I spent a lot of time gaining information on Reddit so I figured I'd give back by summarizing how I filed my (U.S.) taxes in what I believe was the correct manner. Real quick, I used Cointracking.info (can also use Bitcoin.tax) to calculate my gains/losses using FIFO and generate my tax reports. I filed using the Deluxe desktop version of Turbotax so I can upload my reports. NO I DID NOT HAVE TO MANUALLY ENTER EACH TRANSACTION! But you have to get the CD/Downloaded version of Turbotax. There is no web version that allows you to upload your reports...and don't worry, after calling to confirm this with Turbotax I let them have it. Also, I am not being paid or providing referrals to any of these sites/programs....they worked for me so I figured I'd share for free.
I am not a tax or accountant professional so take the following with a grain of salt....
First things first, you have to figure out your "realized" crypto gains. I'm not going to go into detail here as many will ignore the truth that converting from one crypto to another is considered a taxable event. You're an adult, you make your own decisions but honestly I was surprised at how little of my crypto was considered realized once I ran all my numbers.
Since I've started crypto, I've used a couple different exchanges and Shapeshift (will never use again after this whole ordeal). Cointracking.info gives instructions on how to import your trades from all the major exchanges. (WARNING: pay attention to the timezones; Coinbase for example shows you the time of transaction in your timezone when you're viewing the site but once you download the data it will switch to Pacific Time, Binance will be in UTC time...etc.) If you don't have the time correct then your FIFO calculations and Short/Long term gains can be off. Shapeshift or any other non-exchange activity can be uploaded using excel or you can manually add individual transactions. Don't forget to review the transactions once you think you have every thing into your coin tracking site as the super nerds who created the algorithms aren't always correct. Ask your self questions like "did I really make a trade at 3:00 am on a work-night" or "does my final balance match what I actually have in my wallets".
Once you have all your transactions completed you can download the Form 8949, (keep this for your records in case you're ever audited or more information is requested) and a Turbotax specific file called Capital Gains Report. File your taxes on the DESKTOP version of Turbotax as you normally would. When it asks about income there is a place you can go to upload documents. Upload the Capital Gains Report provided. Turbotax is smart enough to recognize and auto populate all ~75 trades that I had onto a 1099-B. Again, NOT A PROFESSIONAL, I heard something about mailing in your Schedule D/8949 but everything seems to be reported correctly on the 1099-B so this does not appear to be necessary. And that was it! I live in North Carolina and I did not see anywhere where I needed to report any of this information for the state form.
If you don't want to believe a stranger on Reddit then you can get the desktop version of the Premier Turbotax which comes with the ability to get free CPA help over the phone. Or you go to your tax professional and have him/her do your taxes but they'll need the Form 8949 provided to you by your coin tracking site.
I tried posting this to cryptocurrency but apparently I'm not cool enough to post there and help people out. Vertcoin was the first community I followed when I first got into alt coins so you get my love first.
Feel free to let me know if I'm an idiot in the comments as again, I am not a tax professional nor an accountant, just a guy who likes to DIY and learn how/why taxes work to save some money.
submitted by Lusitanius to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Please help - Margin and short position trades - JAFX - Able to enter accurately with Bitcoin.tax?

EDIT: I am in the U.S., asking in reference to U.S. tax filing for 2018

I've been searching and can't seem to find enough information regarding this topic. I traded through JAFX last year using a margin account, long and short positions. I am able to pull all of the transaction history, including date/time of trade open/close, price at position open, price at position close, profit/loss per trade, etc... (fairly detailed and contains all pertinent information)

I'm having to manually create an excel spreadsheet (can do CSV too) but when I enter into bitcoin.tax:
  1. I have to manually adjust the position size (as it lists, for example, .25 LTC although the total position value was 25LTC (.25 of 1:10 leverage) - changed leverage a few times throughout the year so I'll have to figure each of those out to make sure they calculate correctly
  2. I have to adjust the short positions as sell first then a buy but the date/time confuses the calculator because it has sells before buy
  3. Other various editing issues which I can identify and resolve like formatting of date/time not accepted on all lines, etc....
  4. If I go through the trouble of continuing with this excel sheet, will it calculate correctly with the mismatched times and confusion over sells before buys or is it possible to file these trades as a lump somehow?
Also, I funded the account through Coinbase, I have not uploaded my CB data into Bitcoin.tax yet but I'm assuming it will show the BTC transfer out. I have the JAFX incoming transfer information/amounts (transferred from CB as BTC, received in JAFX as USD - I can disregard fees and pay whatever tax on the full amount of the BTC transfer, if possible) so I can easily justify receipt of those funds from somewhere. All of the money sent from Coinbase to JAFX was ultimately lost, so at the end of the year my balance was $0 with no withdrawals out, only $1.36 for inactivity, withdrawn to JAFX, not to my bank or account.

Any suggestion on how to handle these trades?? The rest of my trades were through Coinbase and Binance so I'll use API to get those in but this group of trades are a nuisance...

Thank you in advance to anyone that can help!!
submitted by ag48600 to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year

How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year Chandan Lodha Contributor Chandan Lodha is co-founder at CoinTracker, a Y Combinator and Initialized Capital-backed startup that offers a secure cryptocurrency tax calculator. He was previously the Product Manager on Project Loon at Google[x]. Fred traded bitcoin, ether and a handful of other cryptocurrencies on Gemini, Binance and Coinbase last year. Unfortunately, due to the … Continue reading How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year → March 28, 2019 at 10:04PM
https://ift.tt/2YxPfZi
submitted by tonnie_taller to Tonnie_Taller [link] [comments]

How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year

How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year Chandan Lodha Contributor Chandan Lodha is co-founder at CoinTracker, a Y Combinator and Initialized Capital-backed startup that offers a secure cryptocurrency tax calculator. He was previously the Product Manager on Project Loon at Google[x]. Fred traded bitcoin, ether and a handful of other cryptocurrencies on Gemini, Binance and Coinbase last year. Unfortunately, due to the … Continue reading How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year → March 28, 2019 at 10:32PM
https://ift.tt/2FK3NO3
submitted by tonnie_taller to Tonnie_Taller [link] [comments]

In case you missed it: Major Crypto and Blockchain News from the week ending 12/14/2018

Developments in Financial Services

Regulatory Environment

General News


submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Margin trading on Poloniex and Bitcoin.tax

Hello everyone, I am sure many people here are in a rush to get their taxes done. I selected bitcoin.tax for my taxes but have been having some really big issues with them which is discouraging considering they seem to be the main place that people recommend for getting that stuff done around here.
When I first imported my full transaction history from Bitfinex, Binance, Bittrex, Coinbase, GDAX, and Poloniex, I had completely wrong estimates for how much capital gains I had made, like an entire magnitude off. After working with them and reimporting stuff a few times, it seems like those issues are mainly worked out. Still, I'm not sure I would recommend the site in general because at least for me with 10000+ transactions it has having extreme lag all the time, the calculate page doesn't work at all, and many other parts are very slow or take many retries to load (despite me paying 100 bucks for this).
I just have a question for those of you who HAVE used it successfully though. How the hell do you deal with margin trading on Poloniex? I am probably going to have to manually work through every single one of those margin trades and report them as either a gain or loss in BTC or whatever I was holding because bitcoin.tax is interpreting all of these margin trades as just generating free money for myself despite me taking gains or losses on the trades and of course giving back whatever I lended at the end of each position. Do you guys have any advice for this because honestly I'm probably just gonna delete every margin trade from my history as it's incompatible from the website and then just do my best to say the result after that position was closed...
submitted by ThisGoldAintFree to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

US Tax Guide for Cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, cryptax! Tax season is upon us, and in the next couple of months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As a tax professional, an Enrolled Agent, and a cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell BTC, ETH, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my BTC for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the BTC, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my BTC to buy another cryptocurrency (XMR for example), is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your BTC for USD. The second transaction is buying the XMR with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts (or use a website such as bitcoin.tax or software to calculate it for you). For example, I buy 1 BTC for $8,000 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 BTC rises to $9,000. I transfer that 1 BTC to Bittrex and use it to buy 38 XMR. I have to report a capital gain of $1,000 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 38 XMR I purchased is $9,000.
 
4. If I use my BTC to buy another cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Another is that there has to be a Qualified Intermediary that facilitates a like-kind exchange. So, it's a more involved process, and that's why I think cryptocurrency cannot be like-kind exchanged.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 BTC for $3,000 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 BTC for $18,000. Your realized gain would be $18,000 - $3,000 = $15,000. Since you held it for one year or less, the $15,000 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which BTC's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first BTC at $3,000, a second BTC at $5,300, and a third BTC at $4,000. Later on, I sell one BTC for $8,000. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first BTC, $3,000, which would result in a gain of $5,000.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third BTC, $4,000, which would result in a gain of $4,000.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three BTC, $4,100, which would result in a gain of $3,900.
Specific identification - I can choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second BTC's cost basis, $5,300, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $2,700.
The IRS has not given any guidance on cost basis accounting methods for cryptocurrency, but I am taking the position that any method can be used, and that you can change your method at any time as you please (e.g. FIFO for one year, LIFO for another. Or, FIFO for the sale of a specific lot, then LIFO for the sale of another lot on the same day).
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine BTC or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $8,000 worth of BTC in 2017, you must report $8,000 of ordinary income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $8,000 becomes the cost basis in your BTC position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 0.01 BTC on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for BTC and average the high and low prices for BTC on December 31, 2017, which is ($14,377.40 + $12,755.60) / 2 = $13,566.50. I would report $13,566.50 * 0.01 = $135.67 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 0.01 BTC I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive BTC or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use BTC or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your BTC at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. If I move my BTC from one exchange to another, or into a hard wallet, is this a taxable event?
No - you are not selling anything, so no gains are realized.
 
21. Where do I report cryptocurrency sales on my tax return?
The summary of your sales would reported on Schedule D on line 3 and/or line 10 depending on short-term or long-term. Supplemental Form 8949 must also be included with Box C or Box F checked depending on short-term or long-term. Form 8949 is where you must list each individual sale.
 
22. If coins become lost or inaccessible (e.g. lost or forgotten passphrase or thrown away hard drive), can I claim that as a loss? What about coins that have gotten stolen? What about losing money in investment or ICO scams (e.g. Bitconnect or Confido)?
These are really tricky questions. Unfortunately, the potential to claim such a loss against ordinary income is very low, especially with the new tax law. At the very least, capital losses can be claimed, but the deduction is capped at $3,000 per year against ordinary income with the rest carrying forward indefinitely.
The new tax law changed the casualty and theft loss to only apply to presidential disaster areas, so at least in the case of a loss passphrase, I think the answer is no for 2018 and going forward. For 2017, the answer is possibly yes. Here is an article on the subject if you are interested in reading more.
 
23. Taxation is theft!
Sorry, I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one and this one, but I wanted to post my guide on cryptax which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I may make many edits to my post after I originally post it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to cryptax [link] [comments]

How to file taxes on your cryptocurrency trades in a bear year

Fred traded bitcoin, ether and a handful of other cryptocurrencies on Gemini, Binance and Coinbase last year. Unfortunately, due to the crypto downturn, his trading yielded a capital loss of more than $35,000. He’s not alone — the stories have been coming out right and left about people who are not already rich, who have lost serious money lately.
While it was a rough loss, filing taxes could add another headache in a few weeks if not done correctly.
Given that bitcoin is down 55 percent year-over-year in 2018, compared to 686 percent up the year before, chances are that filing taxes on crypto trades may look quite different this year for crypto holders like Fred.
The main difference is that users will want to claim capital losses in a bear year to reduce their tax bill. That means ensuring that you are maximizing your capital loss claims to the greatest potential by:

Capital loss example

To get an understanding of how powerful this is, let’s take an example. Imagine Maya earned $5,000 in the stock market in 2018, but lost $9,000 in cryptocurrency trading in the same year. Without filing cryptocurrency taxes, Maya would be on the hook for capital gains taxes on $5,000 from the stock market. At the 24 percent short-term tax rate, that would be $1,200 ($5,000 * 24 percent) to pay in taxes!
Now, taking into account the $9,000 crypto capital loss, all $5,000 of capital gains in the stock market would be offset, leaving an additional $4,000 of losses. Because Maya is single, an additional $3,000 of income could be offset (which normally would also be taxed at 24 percent). Therefore, you would save $1,200 of taxes (from the stock market) and $720 ($3,000 * 24 percent) that would have been paid in income tax, for a total of $1,920 saved in taxes. And, on top of that, Maya would still have an incremental $1,000 ($9,000 — $5,000 — $3,000) of capital losses that could be rolled forward to the 2019 tax year to offset capital gains (and potentially income) the next year as well. Not bad.

2018 tax changes

The last year brought many new cryptocurrency trading pairs versus earlier years, as well as more transactions on more exchanges. This means, more than ever, you’ll want to ensure that you have all your accounts or records from all the accounts handy.
There are also regulatory differences as well. This year for U.S. holders, the IRS has clarified that like-kind exchanges only apply to real property (like real estate). That means that cryptocurrency-to-cryptocurrency trades in 2018 are subject to capital gains calculations, not just when you cash out to fiat currency (e.g. USD) at the end of the day.
According to IRS guidance, all virtual currencies are taxed as property, whether you hold bitcoin, ether or any other cryptocurrency. With the new clarification that like-kind exchange does not apply to cryptocurrency, this means you need to have solid records of every cryptocurrency transaction you made, including crypto-to-crypto transactions.
submitted by HashBXGlobal to u/HashBXGlobal [link] [comments]

I created a Free Tax Calculator and subtly promote NANO in it. Please Read!

Edit: The "historical Price Download", is not working anymore as bandwidth on Github LFS is limited (I didnt know that). I am reuploading it on Google Drive after work :))
Hi together! I created a Free Python Script to process your trade histories.
I am a big NANO supporter and I subtly promote NANO in it :P (Check out the Logo and Screenshots) As I could only use my transaction histories I need your help.
Please follow the HOWTO (below) and try to calculate your profits! If you run into any problems (and there will be bugs!) or if you need more exchanges write it in the comments and I will add them! (I could only integrate the ones I use, cause I only got csv files from there)
The tool is working fine for me and I could perfectly calculate my profit, payed fees and last buy times to determine the 12 month holding time.

The code is not that complex, so take a look at it and feel free to add, correct or modify stuff and make sure to push it :)

CryptoProfIT (Alpha Version)

https://github.com/LucidSkyWalkeCryptoProfIT/blob/masteREADME.md
The profit result can be used to calculate the tax on your crypto. The output are two csv-files. Example Screenshots can be found below.
The output files contain: - Sorted full trade history (converts all exchange exports to the same formatting) - Fees per Trade (inklusive Overall Payed fees) - Profit per trade (Overall profit. This can be used to easily calculate your personal capital taxes) - Profit can be calculated in EUR or USD. (Data from European Central Bank) - Amount of your Cryptocurrencies - Display the different BUY-INs by amount and date. So you can control the 12 month holding period.
Supported Exchanges: Binance, Bitfinex, Bittrex, Kraken, Mercatox, Poloniex, Costum*
*A dummy file is included that can be used to easily add trades of other exchanges. If you give me a csv-file export from other exchanges (you can modify the digits for privacy) I will add them.
PLEASE READ: I wrote this tool to calculate my taxes and it did the job fine! Nevertheless it is not well tested yet. If you run into trouble, please write an issue and I will fix it! Thank you :)

Screenshots

Screenshot1 Screenshot of the output.csv. The data of all exchanges is formatted in its specific ways and displayed in a uniform style. Type always refers to the first token of the pair! (First transaction shows buying XRP by BTC) Base Price always refers to the second token of the pair. Base Price in USD shows the price of the second token in USD.
Screenshot2 Screenshot of the holding_output.csv. This file can be used to specify your remaining holding times, as Capital gains do not need to be taxed in many countries after 12 month The picture shows (in red), that the first of the remaining ETH were bought on 2017-06-02, meaning that this amount is tax-free one year later. The blue frame shows the date for the next tokens...
Screenshot3 Console output of the Python script (Not my real data ;)

Requirements

For now, there is no Gui so you have to use the python script. If some dev likes to help, making a gui or a brython version would be neat.

HOWTO:

Setting up Python:

Using the script:

* This package uses the European Central Bank as source for EUUSD to get the historical exchange rates. Author: Alex Prengère Home Page: https://github.com/alexprengere/currencyconverter

Fork information:

A tax accountant told me, you need to pay taxes on the profit of your received forked coins as soon as you get them. Therefore a "dummy" trade needs to be manually added to one of the csv export files in "trade_history_files". * Add a "Buy" transaction at the moment you reveived the coins. (with price "0") * Add a "Sell" transaction a few seconds later (price = initial price of forked coin) you made the inital profit. * Add a "Buy" transaction a few seconds later than before (price = initial price) Because you know still got the coins Simplifing this could be a feature in a future version...

Using the dummy-file:

You can use this file to add trades from exchanges that do not provide trade history exports. Important: You have to use the same formatting like the sample data in the file. Ensure the right date formatting, and use "." for decimals.

Other Information:

Disclaimer:

I wrote this tool to calculate my taxes and thought I share it. I do not guarantee that the results are 100% accurate, but the script might help you getting a well formatted output csv you can work with.

Contact

If you run into any problems, don't hesitate to contact me at any time.

XBR TO THE MOON Donations: xrb_3mwnrhq1d4pdcrgegyygic1a1wpcbnsaj6pd5656dg3yxio3cyg1rn4u1umx
submitted by LucidSkywalker91 to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Can you report difference exchanges separately? Cold storage vs active trading accounts

Alright - this is something that has really been on my mind as I am pouring through trades, reading tax laws and attempting to pay the tax man.
For casual traders, or those without a complex history of trading, transfers and the like, Uploading all of your balances to cointracking.info, hitting calculate and reporting numbers can actually be pretty easy. The service is awesome.
However, just as we all have different stock brokerages.. Fidelity, ETrade..etc. which are reported separately* , can we do the same for crypto? If I deposit 5 BTC to Binance and proceed to trade it 10k times and make a profit, should that trading affect the cost basis of coins that were bought 3 years ago and are sitting in a cold storage wallet or on a different exchange that has not been traded with recently?
Perhaps my question is best posed with a hypothetical scenario:
Let's say I bought all my btc/eth/ltc on Coinbase. Kept some there, moved some to a wallet, and some to various exchanges, let's say.. Kraken and Poloniex.
On Kraken, I bought some ETH and held it..haven't sold.
On Poloniex, I used the BTC sent from coinbase to buy ETH and then sold it, bought more.. over and over.
Calculating Taxes.. - If I use bitcoin.tax, or cointracking.info and generate a report with ALL coins and transactions, the trades at Poloniex calculate a basis as if the coins on Kraken were being sold - thus triggering massive long term gains. Yet those coins on Kraken have not been transacted upon.
However, If I were to calculate capital gains on a per exchange basis, the calculated gains/tax implications are significantly improved. And the cost basis of cold storage coins or coins on exchanges from old buys are left untouched.
Which is the appropriate way to calculate taxes? Can you separate holdings and trades into different exchanges or lots based on activity? If this is acceptable, do you need to report multiple 8949 forms, one specific to each trading category?
Categories could be granular or as general, different for everyone and how they've moved around coins I suppose. Could be something like... - Kraken - Kraken Margin - Poloniex - Poloniex Margin - Various Exchanges (Coinbase/GDAX..etc)
Does one need to be consistent in how the categories are separated out? If i have 5 exchanges that do not trade often, but have commingled transfers between them, it is more difficult to separate those trades out, so grouping them together may make sense. Alternatively, it could make sense to separate out Margin trading and regular trading on the same exchange in the case of Poloniex where the margin and exchange balances are held in separate buckets.
Appreciate your input on this
submitted by Simonsaid2 to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

Margin trading on Poloniex and Bitcoin.tax

Hello everyone, I am sure many people here are in a rush to get their taxes done. I selected bitcoin.tax for my taxes but have been having some really big issues with them which is discouraging considering they seem to be the main place that people recommend for getting that stuff done around here.
When I first imported my full transaction history from Bitfinex, Binance, Bittrex, Coinbase, GDAX, and Poloniex, I had completely wrong estimates for how much capital gains I had made, like an entire magnitude off. After working with them and reimporting stuff a few times, it seems like those issues are mainly worked out. Still, I'm not sure I would recommend the site in general because at least for me with 10000+ transactions it has having extreme lag all the time, the calculate page doesn't work at all, and many other parts are very slow or take many retries to load (despite me paying 100 bucks for this).
I just have a question for those of you who HAVE used it successfully though. How the hell do you deal with margin trading on Poloniex? I am probably going to have to manually work through every single one of those margin trades and report them as either a gain or loss in BTC or whatever I was holding because bitcoin.tax is interpreting all of these margin trades as just generating free money for myself despite me taking gains or losses on the trades and of course giving back whatever I lended at the end of each position. Do you guys have any advice for this because honestly I'm probably just gonna delete every margin trade from my history as it's incompatible from the website and then just do my best to say the result after that position was closed...
submitted by ThisGoldAintFree to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

CryptoProfIT: Free Tool for Tax Calculation. (Community Project, Please Read!)

Hi together! I created a Free Python Script to process your trade histories.
It would be awesome if this would become a community project which everybody involved in Cryptos can use for FREE.
The logic should be ready and next steps would be: -testing -creating gui or webapplication -adding features
Follow the HOWTO (below) and to calculate your profits etc.! If you run into any problems or if you need more exchanges write it in the comments and I will add them! (I could only integrate the ones I use, cause I only got csv files from there)
The tool is working fine for me and I could perfectly calculate my profit, payed fees and last buy times to determine the 12 month holding time.

The code is not that complex, so take a look at it and feel free to add, correct or modify stuff and make sure to push it :)

CryptoProfIT (Alpha Version)

https://github.com/LucidSkyWalkeCryptoProfIT/blob/masteREADME.md
The profit result can be used to calculate the tax on your crypto. The output are two csv-files. Example Screenshots can be found below.
The output files contain: - Sorted full trade history (converts all exchange exports to the same formatting) - Fees per Trade (inklusive Overall Payed fees) - Profit per trade (Overall profit. This can be used to easily calculate your personal capital taxes) - Profit can be calculated in EUR or USD. (Data from European Central Bank) - Amount of your Cryptocurrencies - Display the different BUY-INs by amount and date. So you can control the 12 month holding period.
Supported Exchanges: Binance, Bitfinex, Bittrex, Kraken, Mercatox, Poloniex, Costum*
*A dummy file is included that can be used to easily add trades of other exchanges. If you give me a csv-file export from other exchanges (you can modify the digits for privacy) I will add them.
PLEASE READ: I wrote this tool to calculate my taxes and it did the job fine! Nevertheless it is not well tested yet. If you run into trouble, please write an issue and I will fix it! Thank you :)

Screenshots

Screenshot1 Screenshot of the output.csv. The data of all exchanges is formatted in its specific ways and displayed in a uniform style. Type always refers to the first token of the pair! (First transaction shows buying XRP by BTC) Base Price always refers to the second token of the pair. Base Price in USD shows the price of the second token in USD.
Screenshot2 Screenshot of the holding_output.csv. This file can be used to specify your remaining holding times, as Capital gains do not need to be taxed in many countries after 12 month The picture shows (in red), that the first of the remaining ETH were bought on 2017-06-02, meaning that this amount is tax-free one year later. The blue frame shows the date for the next tokens...
Screenshot3 Console output of the Python script (Not my real data ;)

Requirements

For now, there is no Gui so you have to use the python script. If some dev likes to help, making a gui or a brython version would be neat.

HOWTO:

Setting up Python:

Using the script:

* This package uses the European Central Bank as source for EUUSD to get the historical exchange rates. Author: Alex Prengère Home Page: https://github.com/alexprengere/currencyconverter

Fork information:

A tax accountant told me, you need to pay taxes on the profit of your received forked coins as soon as you get them. Therefore a "dummy" trade needs to be manually added to one of the csv export files in "trade_history_files". * Add a "Buy" transaction at the moment you reveived the coins. (with price "0") * Add a "Sell" transaction a few seconds later (price = initial price of forked coin) you made the inital profit. * Add a "Buy" transaction a few seconds later than before (price = initial price) Because you know still got the coins Simplifing this could be a feature in a future version...

Using the dummy-file:

You can use this file to add trades from exchanges that do not provide trade history exports. Important: You have to use the same formatting like the sample data in the file. Ensure the right date formatting, and use "." for decimals.

Other Information:

Disclaimer:

I wrote this tool to calculate my taxes and thought I share it. I do not guarantee that the results are 100% accurate, but the script might help you getting a well formatted output csv you can work with.

Contact

If you run into any problems, don't hesitate to contact me at any time.

Donations: xrb_3mwnrhq1d4pdcrgegyygic1a1wpcbnsaj6pd5656dg3yxio3cyg1rn4u1umx
submitted by LucidSkywalker91 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin.tax

Hi all,
My aggregate experience is as follows:
  1. I bought bitcoin, ethereum, and litecoin, all in 2017, in both coinbase and GDAX
  2. I transferred some bitcoin to gatehub.net and exchanged the bitcoin for ripple
  3. I transferred that ripple from gatehub to binance.
  4. I transferred bitcoin and ethereum to binance.
  5. In binance, I used bitcoin, ethereum, and ripple to exchange for some altcoins, with a few exchanges back into bitcoin.
  6. I sold half my bitcoin on gdax and immediately rebought at a slightly lower price.
I have attempted to put all this into bitcoin.tax, and i was able to import the coinbase, gdax, and binance trade history into it quite easily. I had to manually put in the gatehub.net exchange of bitcoin for ripple.
It appears there is a difference between the "like kind exchange" final calculation for my taxable gains. When i quick like kind exchange, the taxes are obviously lower, and when i unclick it, the taxes are higher. The only problem I am having is that it appears that the exchange of bitcoin and ethereum for altcoins in binance are being recorded mostly as "buys", and im not fully convinced it is considering these as taxable events, Though the total taxes owed (using "like kind exchange" and not using it) is significant enough to think I am just misinterpreting this. Does anyone have alot of experience with bitcoin.tax? Please let me know. Thanks!
submitted by jbergas to CryptoTax [link] [comments]

Crypto News Recap for the week ending August 3rd

Developments in Financial Services

Regulatory

General News

submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How do I account for Transaction/Withdraw fees on Bitcoin.tax?

My issue is with how my coin volume is handled when I do transfers or transactions.
For example, this is how a section of my trades currently looks like in Bitcoin.tax's trade section.
Date/Time Exchange/Source Action Coin Volume Price Fees
12/06/2017 1:17:16 PM Coinbase BUY ETH 1.08484583 $443.22000 $19.18000
12/06/2017 1:42:07 PM Binance BUY REQ 4810 0.00022604 ETH 4.81000000 REQ
Within Bitcoin.tax, how am I supposed to account for coins I lose due to transaction fees/withdraw fees between exchanges and wallets? I tried using the "FEE" input field and while it shows the appropriate values in the spreadsheet, for my final year balance calculation, it doesn't deduct those fees from my original balance.
Here is what the actual trade process looked like.
Date/Time Exchange/Source Action Coin Volume Price Fees
12/06/2017 1:17:16 PM Coinbase BUY ETH 1.08484583 $443.22000 $19.18000
12/06/2017 1:21:21 PM Coinbase TRANSFER to BINANCE ETH 1.08643378 need to look up 0.000882 ETH
12/06/2017 1:42:07 PM Binance BUY REQ 4810 0.00022604 ETH 4.81000000 REQ
12/07/2017 4:38:28 PM Binance Withdraw to MyEtherWallet REQ need to look up 30 REQ
How should I go about preparing/fixing this issue? Do I put the transaction fees/withdraw fess in the Spending section instead?
submitted by cryptotaxquest to CryptoTax [link] [comments]

bitcoin.tax

Hi all,
My aggregate experience is as follows:
I bought bitcoin, ethereum, and litecoin, all in 2017, in both coinbase and GDAX I transferred some bitcoin to gatehub.net and exchanged the bitcoin for ripple I transferred that ripple from gatehub to binance. I transferred bitcoin and ethereum to binance. In binance, I used bitcoin, ethereum, and ripple to exchange for some altcoins, with a few exchanges back into bitcoin. I sold half my bitcoin on gdax and immediately rebought at a slightly lower price. 
I have attempted to put all this into bitcoin.tax, and i was able to import the coinbase, gdax, and binance trade history into it quite easily. I had to manually put in the gatehub.net exchange of bitcoin for ripple.
It appears there is a difference between the "like kind exchange" final calculation for my taxable gains. When i quick like kind exchange, the taxes are obviously lower, and when i unclick it, the taxes are higher. The only problem I am having is that it appears that the exchange of bitcoin and ethereum for altcoins in binance are being recorded mostly as "buys", and im not fully convinced it is considering these as taxable events, Though the total taxes owed (using "like kind exchange" and not using it) is significant enough to think I am just misinterpreting this. Does anyone have alot of experience with bitcoin.tax? Please let me know. Thanks!
submitted by jbergas to binance [link] [comments]

How to Calculate your Crypto Trading Profits - Altrady for Better Cryptocurrency Profit 2020 How to Create Coinbase Bitcoin Wallet Address 2020 Crypto-Currency Taxes  Everything you need to know to File in 2018  Easiest Way to File Crypto Tax Binance Tax Reporting - Instant Tax Forms  CryptoTrader.Tax Demo One Quick Tip With Taxes & Crypto For Coinbase Users CRYPTO TAXES TUTORIAL - Coinbase Report Tool & IRS Guidelines How to calculate Bitcoin Profit and Loss Easily? Explained in Tamil How to file your cryptocurrency & bitcoin taxes with ... Coinbase - Downloading Tax Reports (Beta) - YouTube

ZenLedger is much more than a Bitcoin tax calculator. We handle the tedious, confusing work of calculating taxes on Bitcoin, from beginning-to-end, providing you with money-saving tips and tools along the way. The final results are auto-completed tax forms and audit reports to check with your CPA. Coinbase tax calculator tool. Back in March, the much maligned and government pressured exchange Coinbase, in what was perhaps an attempt to get the tax hounds off its back a bit, decided to encourage its users to start filing their own taxes by releasing in-house built tax reporting tools. In a short blog post, they explained how they ... For crypto owners looking to estimate how much they owe in taxes, there are some platforms with a free crypto tax calculator. They integrate with major crypto exchanges and wallets, allowing you ... Online Crypto Tax Calculator with support for over 65 exchanges. $99 for all financial years. Money Back Guarantee. Crypto Tax Calculator. Import your data and calculate your cryptocurrency taxes in seconds. Made in Australia 🇦🇺 Start free trial. Support for almost every exchange. We have worked hard to integrate every exchange we know of. Connect major Australian and international ... Calculate Cryptocurrency Taxes Easily File Your Bitcoin and Crypto Taxes. If you own or have traded cryptocurrencies, you may need to include these in your tax forms, even if you didn't make any money. Bitcoin.Tax is the most established crypto tax calculation service that can work out your capital gains and losses and produce the data and forms you need to file your taxes. Bitcoin Taxes provides useful information about tax requirements in countries such as the U.S., the U.K., Germany, Australia, Japan, and Canada, explains basic terms related to crypto taxation ... To answer the many questions on crypto and taxes, the IRS has issued crypto tax guidance. In previous tax seasons, we received a lot of questions from crypto newbies and experienced customers alike. We get it — paying bitcoin taxes and other crypto taxes can be confusing. While we can’t give tax advice, we want to make crypto easier to buy ... Binance has grown to be one of the largest cryptocurrency exchanges in the world. Millions of traders use Binance as a result of its broad support for a large number of cryptocurrencies and its relative ease of use. However, when it comes to doing your Binance taxes and building out your required Binance tax forms, many challenges arise.

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How to Calculate your Crypto Trading Profits - Altrady for Better Cryptocurrency Profit 2020

CoinTracker tutorial on how to file your cryptocurrency and bitcoin taxes with CoinTracker and TurboTax. Import your transactions from top exchanges includin... Video Highlights: Bitcoin Profit Loss Calculator App Binance New Feature Koinex Free Trading Option #Delta #Bitcoin #cryptotamil How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Fast Using Velocity Banking How To Pay Off Your Mortgage In 5-7 Years - Duration: 41:34. Think Wealthy with Mike Adams 799,245 views Taxes and regulation are coming to this space. One quick tip here to protect yourself against making this one mistake when dealing with taxes if you use Coinbase. I had this in the middle of ... If you don't know how to calculate cryptocurrency trading profits in 2020, Altrady brings you this cryptocurrency for beginner's video to help you calculate your crypto profits. More info - https ... How to use BINANCE Exchange (Beginners Guide) ... 23:48. Crypto Fiend 321,753 views. 23:48. The Easiest Way To Do You Crypto Taxes [Bitcoin.tax Review] - Duration: 9:15. Crypto Bros 1,498 views. 9 ... CRYPTO TAXES TUTORIAL - Coinbase Report Tool & IRS Guidelines sunny decree. Loading... Unsubscribe from sunny decree? Cancel Unsubscribe. Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 122K. Loading ... This video demonstrates how you can import your Binance trades into CryptoTrader.Tax to generate one-click tax reports. For more information on doing your Bi... Summary: In this video I show you how to use Coinbase's tax tool/reporting, which is still in beta. Have questions? Comment them in?

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